The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony returned to the West Coast for the first time in 20 years this April, to induct a new class of musicians and industry icons in a nearly 5-hour evening of music and merriment at Los Angeles? Nokia Theatre. The class of 2013?Public Enemy, Rush, Heart, Randy Newman, Donna Summer, Albert King, Quincy Jones and Lou Adler?were honored by a who?s who of music past and present. For the 13th year, Firehouse Productions handled the audio portion of the show, with Mark Dittmar spearheading the onsite crew comprised of Production Mixer Barry Warrick, Music Mixer Ron Reaves (on an SD7) and Mike Parker handling monitors (SD7).

The show has grown exponentially over the years into what Dittmar calls ?fast and stupid.? ?And I don?t mean that in a derogatory way,? he laughs. ?It?s just that this is the sort of show that keeps growing and giving and growing and giving, and they will never get smaller. There?s so much more desire for content, and there?s a lot more figuring it out on-site. Ten years ago you would spend a huge amount of prep time. Now you fly in and the producer?s like, ?Oh, I just added a band.? Last year they added Green Day, literally two days before the show and we?d already loaded in. We don?t get to say, ?I?m sorry you didn?t tell us that three weeks ago, we can?t do it.? You say, ?OK, we have an hour to set them up.? You look at what we do routinely now, and if you had asked us to do it 10 years ago, we would have freaked out. We simply didn?t have the tools or the technology to accomplish it. Two years ago we outgrew our Yamaha PM1Ds at FOH and in monitor world because the show kept adding inputs to the point that our only choice in inventory were the DiGiCo SD7s, and it was a logical move for doing these shows. The pace has become very, very fast and we have a great team and great tools in place now that can get the job done easily.?